The Basics Of How To Grow An Organic Garden (2)

The Basics Of How To Grow An Organic Garden

A collection of tips on how to begin organic gardening, makes the perfect starting point for a beginner to emerge and hopefully, begin growing their own organic produce much easier. Below is just such a collection that will hopefully assist the eager novice into eventually, becoming a pro, when it comes to organic gardening.

Cover bare spots when you plant. When you put a new plant into your organic garden, do not leave the earth bare where you planted. Make sure you mulch the area all around your new plant. This will protect it while it begins to grow. This will also keep the ground moist.

Aerate your compost pile with PVC pipes. An ideal compost pile should be about 3 to 4 feet high, but it needs aeration throughout the pile. By installing a perforated pipe you can avoid the routine of constantly turning the pile over. If you add a perforated pipe in the center of the compost pile, air will flow freely, helping decomposition.

To prepare the ground for your organic perennial plants, simply cut the turf and turn it over a few weeks before planting time. Spread wood chips a few inches deep on the freshly-turned soil, and within a couple of weeks the ground will be ideal for your organic perennials. These hardy plants need only a little bit of preparation.

If you are going to go organic in your gardening efforts, be sure to mulch your garden with at least 3 inches of organic material. This will help to conserve water, add nutrients and humus to the soil and will discourage weeds. It also gives your garden a nice appearance.

Plant Zinnias in full sun, good soil with lots of compost added; give them about one inch of water a week. Avoid wetting foliage, as some are prone to powdery mildew. Clip spent blooms often to keep each plant producing flowers, or cut just above the next branch emerging for beautiful cut flowers.

Soaker hoses can make an outstanding addition to almost any organic garden. Soaker hoses allow the gardener to provide low-pressure watering over long periods of time to the plants that need it. When they take the place of hours of fussy hand-watering, such hoses are well worth the investment the gardener makes in them.

If you are trying to grow tomatoes from seed, use old drink cups or yogurt containers to start them. When they are ready to be transplanted, just cut the bottom off of the cup and put them right into the ground. This will help protect the new plant from worms and other pests.

Plants that thrive in mulch and acid-based fertilizers benefit from a think layer of pine needles. This is a great thing to do in the fall, as it also adds insulation from cold weather, and as the layer of pine needles decompose they will saturate the soil with their acid.

Hopefully, this collection of tips were enough to give you a great start on what to do and expect when it comes to growing your own organic plants. This collection was carefully constructed to be an aid in your arsenal, so that you can begin to hone your organic gardening skills into growing healthy organic produce.